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Cape Buffalo Form Preparation Is the  Name of the Game

Cape Buffalo Form Preparation Is the Name of the Game

by World Champion Joe Meder

With an ever growing demand for African mounts, taxidermists must be prepared to mount some of the more difficult species. A cape buffalo tops the list, presenting some unique challenges not only because of its size, but the character that it exudes in its menacing facial expression. Simply hanging a hide on a mannikin can leave a lot to be desired. Certainly the condition of the cape and the choice of mannikin will play a large role in the final outcome of the mount. A considerable amount of gamehead mounting experience would be beneficial as well. This article will address some of the specific concerns unique to a cape buffalo. Some of the special areas of interest are: (1) proper horn fumigation and set up; (2) shape of the ears and earbutts; (3) eye-setting and its relationship to the lacrimal crease; (4) wrinkles where wrinkles should be; (5) boss reconstruction and finish work; (6) form preparation. As this title implies, how you prepare the form will have a lot to do with how difficult it will be to mount a buffalo. A little extra time spent before the skin goes on the mannikin can make the actual mounting relatively simple.

TO RENEW OR SUBSCRIBE TO BREAKTHROUGH, visit www.breakthroughmagazine.com or call (985) 345-7266.

Saturday, April 20, 2024/Author: Administrator Account/Number of views (383)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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WATERBUCKS: AFRICAN PHOTO REFERENCE STUDY

WATERBUCKS: AFRICAN PHOTO REFERENCE STUDY

by Larry Blomquist

In this second reference study on waterbucks I have a new collection of reference from several sources.The main source will feature many of the photos taken by Texas taxidermist Chip Johnston on his safaris to Africa. Like me, he has a passion for wildlife photography and Chip has sent me over 2,000 photos he has taken to share in Breakthrough. Many of his cape buffalo photos were used in the recent study in Issue 150. Waterbucks are more water-dependent than domestic cattle, and must remain close to a water source. This habitat furnishes waterbucks with a year-round source of food. Mainly grazers, they consume types of coarse grass seldom eaten by other grazing animals and occasionally browse leaves from certain trees and bushes. They feed in the mornings and at night, and rest and ruminate the remainder of the time.

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Saturday, April 20, 2024/Author: Administrator Account/Number of views (335)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Waterfowl Photo Reference Study: Harlequins

Waterfowl Photo Reference Study: Harlequins

by Larry Blomquist

Harlequin ducks are small sea ducks. In North America they are also known as “lords and ladies.” Other names include painted ducks, totem-pole ducks, rock ducks, glacier ducks, mountain ducks, white-eyed divers, squeakers, and blue streaks. Adult breeding males have a colorful and complex plumage pattern. Their bills are blue-grey and their eyes are reddish. Adult females are less colorful, with brownish-grey plumage with three white patches on their heads: a round spot behind the eye, a larger patch from the eye to the bill, and a small spot above the eye.

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Saturday, April 20, 2024/Author: Administrator Account/Number of views (343)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Subscription Prices Going Up

Subscription Prices Going Up

by  Larry Blomquist

On my birthday in August every year I get an interesting one-page printout from my insurance agent. It shows the prices of items on my birth year (1948) compared to average prices for the current year. Many items are compared with price increases from a dozen eggs, a loaf of bread, a CokaCola, on up to a pickup truck and the average home cost from then to now. Yes, it’s an eye-opener and a head-shaker, but certainly not a big surprise. Especially since I get the update every year and our buying habits keeps us aware of rising costs. Inflation is a fact of life and it affects everything we use and consume.  We all see and know what has happened because of inflation over the years, but the last few years have been earth-shaking. We have only had three price increases during our 33 years of producing the most informative taxidermy magazine in the world.

New Subscription Prices begin with the Spring Issue #153 after our publication of winter Issue #152, which will be mailed in March of 2024. You are now reading our Fall Issue #151. Also, the single issue price is now $$15.00.

Beginning April 1, 2024, the new subscription rate for the USA will be as follows:

1-Year Subscription $44.00

2-Year Subscription $78.00

Canada and Mexico, Australia, New Zealand subscription increase as follows:

1-Year Subscription $88.00

2-Year Subscription $160.00

For countries in Europe and Africa we recommend ordering from our European distributors listed here (left) each issue.

Increases in postal costs, printing (mainly paper costs), and production/office costs are the main reasons for this increase. The only other options were going to a lesser weight and quality of paper and reducing the page count of Breakthrough. The beauty, quality, and usefulness of our publication means too much to us and our subscribers to do that. Consider this a subscription for two years at the new price of $78.00, 8 issues equals to only $9.75 per issue. Where else can you buy the super reference, how-to articles, paint schedules, competition news and photo coverage, remarkable motivation, and supply sources all in one place for under $10.00!

Friday, December 15, 2023/Author: Administrator Account/Number of views (581)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating

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New World Title: Habitats, (Importance, Criteria, Rules)

New World Title: Habitats, (Importance, Criteria, Rules)

by  Larry Blomquist

Before deciding to offer a World Title for habitats, I gave a lot of consideration into the importance that habitats have played for moving into our modern era of taxidermy. My first thought was that habitats have had a strong position in taxidermy for well over a hundred years. Look back at our historic museums with dioramas full of natural looking habitats during the end and after the turn of the 19th century. Framed and glass-dome displays were part of home decor in Europe in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and that practice was soon adopted in the USA. The large commercial studios in the United States used habitats with their taxidermy starting in the early 1900s, especially with the growth and popularity of African safaris. When the renaissance of today’s modern taxidermy took off after the 1960s, the use of habitats in taxidermy compositions blossomed into the gamerooms and unbelievable competition pieces we see today.

To renew or subscribe, visit www.breakthroughmagazine.com, or call (985) 345-7266 or 800-783-7266.

Friday, December 15, 2023/Author: Administrator Account/Number of views (652)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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